Thursday, May 21, 2015

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Comics News for May 14, 2015


365 Days of Star Wars Comics, Day 134: Up creek without paddle am I


Cover of Star Wars #20 (June 2004); pencils, inks, and colors by Tony Millionaire

Teniversary Countdown #12: The Greatest Green Lantern of Them All


Panel from Justice League International (1987 series) #10 (February 1988), plot and breakdowns by Keith Giffen, script by J. M. DeMatteis, pencils by Kevin Maguire, inks by Al Gordon, colors by Gene D'Angelo, letters by Bob Lappan

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

The Wonderful World (-616) of Color

Children of the atom! Students of Charles Xavier! Mutants! Feared and hated by the world they have sworn to protect! These are the strangest heroes of them all: The X-Men! Or, if you're Spanish, Patrulla-X! (That's the X-Men with paella on the side, and your choice of flan!)

Of course, the early overseas editions of Marvel comics occasionally suffered from...shall we say...some odd interpretations on their covers. As exhibit A, I give you: Los 4 Fantásticos!

But even when comic companies publish licensed Marvel Comics and use the original cover art, things sometimes get a little...colorful. May I present a Technicolor look at Marvel's Merry Mutants as seen in Spain: Los Weirdly-Colored Hijos del Átomo!

For instance, here the X-Men face off against the menace of...The Blue Magneto!





And the daisy-colored peril of Yellow Juggernaut!







Not to mention Red Polaris!





Can the X-Men survive The Christmas Sentinels? They'd better watch out!





And this is either The Red Beast or Wolverine with a Suntan! SPF, Logan! SPF!





But none of this can prepare you for the Sensational Character Find of 1980, Caucasian Blonde Storm! She's the mutant superhero even Nigel Farage can love!





Yes, Caucasian Blonde Storm! And her team-mate, Caucasian Blonde Nightcrawler!





And their team-mate, Emerald Colossus!





And they're all fighting against Blonde Jean Grey! Okay, okay, I'll admit this one's kinda pushing the joke. But she's Jean Blonde!





Yes, yes, yes, we laff and laff at Patrulla-X's weirdly colored X-Men. Still, it's not quite as bad a stretch as what Australia's Newton Comics did to the X-Men. Not only is Magneto color-coded by a six year old, but the original yellow-and-blue X-Men costumes have been recolored to try to look like their post-X-Men #39 new costumes! And not only what the Sam Scratch is up with the Beast's skin color, but is that monkey bar really hanging from the Avengers logo?!?





Here's an only slightly better attempt to match the original X-Men with their redesigned costumes. Makes you long for that free inside super color poster, doesn't it?





Yes, Newton Comics: home of Black Light Captain America!





And Yellow Daredevil!





Whoops. Well, here's Yellow Daredevil!





There's a lesson in all of this, and that lesson is: foreign comics sometimes get the coloring wrong, and we should laugh at them for that! Though, to be fair, Patrulla-X did eventually come out in a correctly colored version. Except they set the whole scene on a dirt road somewhere outside Hooterville.





Still, they even colored Samuel L. Jackson as a white man.


Teniversary Countdown #13: Truth, Justice, and the American Way

Hey kids, comics! Fun, delightful, laugh-inducing comic books!


Panels from "Superman Goes to Prison" in Action Comics (1938 series) #10 (March 1939), script by Jerry Siegel, pencils by Joe Shuster, inks by Joe Shuster and/or Paul Lauretta, letters by Paul Lauretta

Whoa! That's some pretty serious brutality in our comical book there. Let's turn the page. I'm sure it will be much better there...


Oh dear! oh my oh my. Let's hurry along where I'm sure here will be a light and funny bit featuring Clark Kent and his co-workers...


AIEEEEE! This funny book is makin' me scared! Protect me, Superman! Help me, Man of Tomorrow! Do something heroic!


S-S-S-S-S-Superman? Did you really just say


Superman! Adventure champion of children the globe over!


365 Days of Star Wars Comics, Day 133: Taken…in Space!



Panels from Star Wars Episode I: Qui-Gon Jinn one-shot (May 1999), script by Ryder Windham, pencils by Robert Teranishi, inks and colors by Chris Chuckry, letters by Vickie Williams

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Teniversary Countdown #14: Because of course that's what happens in an Aquaman story


Panel from Aquaman (1962 series) #10 (July-August 1963), script by Jack Miller (?), pencils and inks by Nick Cardy

365 Days of Star Wars Comics, Day 132: Threepio had that sinking feeling


Panels from Star Wars: Starfighter: Crossbones #1 (January 2002), script by Haden Blackman, pencils by Ramon Bachs, inks by Raul Fernández, colors by Brad Anderson, letters by Steve Dutro

Monday, May 11, 2015

Teniversary Countdown #15: Remember back when they'd give a villain her own series? Oh wait


Panels from Harley Quinn (2000 series) #10 (September 2001), script by Karl Kesel, pencils by Terry Dodson, inks by Rachel Dodson, colors by Alex Sinclair, letters by Ken Lopez

365 Days of Star Wars Comics, Day 131: One of these rebels will die at the hands of Darth Vader! Can you guess which one?

Whoops! This shoulda been yesterday.


House ad for Star Wars #2 (August 1977), pencils and inks by Steve Leialoha, printed in The Invaders (1975 series) #19 (August 1977)

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Teniversary Countdown #16: Quiet or papa spank


Panels from "The Isle That Time Forgot!" in Batman (1940 series) #10 (April-May 1942), script by Joseph Greene, pencils and figure inks by Jerry Robinson, background inks and letters by George Roussos

365 Days of Star Wars Comics, Day 130: Now she back in the club in a tight dress / With dreams of someday wearing a white dress

Never forgot: now that Leia Organa is a Disney Princess, she gets all sorts of fabulous fashions and accessories and probably a Princess Song but we all heard her sing in that Holiday Special so no thank you Carrie Fisher!





Panels from Star Wars (1977 series) #95 (May 1985), script by Jo Duffy, pencils by Cynthia Martin, inks by Steve Leialoha, colors by Glynis Oliver-Wein, letters by Rick Parker

Today in Comics History: Clams on Wilted Lettuce go on strike


Panel from C.O.W.L. #4 (August 2014), script by Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel, pencils and inks by Rod Reis, colors by Stéphane Perger, letters by Troy Peteri

Saturday, May 09, 2015

Teniversary Countdown #17: Spidey is tired


Panels from Amazing Spider-Man (1963 series) #10 (March 1964), script by Stan Lee, pencils and inks by Steve Ditko, colors by Stan Goldberg, letters by Sam Rosen

365 Days of Star Wars Comics, Day 129: Doodley Doodley Doodley

Today, let's open Alan Smithee's Little Book of Cinematic Techniques, an invaluable guide to watchin' movies and understanding how they're made, if not necessarily why. Today, let's examine the clever storytelling trick invented by 1940s Bob Hope movies that's well known to the cinemati as Doodley Doodley Doodley. What's that, you may ask? Well, let's go straight to the book!:

Doodley Doodley Doodley (noun): a cinematic technique used to set up an extremely unlikely situation that a character protests, followed by a smash cut to the character doing exactly that thing.

For example:

SKIPPER: It's so easy, Professor! All we have to do is get Gilligan married to the monkey, and we'll get off the island!
GILLIGAN: Oh no! Not me! No way, uh uh! I'm not marrying a monkey!

doodley doodley doodley

PROFESSOR: We are gathered here today...

Or, in the Star Wars Universe:


Panels from "Lucky Stars" in Star Wars Tales #15 (March 2003), script by Brian Augustyn, pencils by Paco Medina, inks by Joe Sanchez, colors by Michelle Madsen, letters by Steve Dutro

doodley doodley doodley


More Leia fashion tomorrow!